September Soundtrack

September is one of my favorite months. The really hot temperatures have largely subsided, but the weather is still very nice. The first leaves on the trees are beginning to turn and tumble to the ground. Harvest is rolling in, and we’re feasting on fresh vegetables every night. Freshly-butchered chicken is on the grill any time we want it. The lambs are growing up, reaching their potential. Fleeces are filling out. Football is back. The baseball season – and playoff hunt – is going down to the wire.

September is also a time of melancholy and of introspection. Summer seems to have vanished in a flash. Much of the year is gone, but much remains to be done. And September is often a month of transitions and new beginnings, especially with school starting. Feeling the cool morning air, I’m often taken back to the beginnings of new school years in my youth. Just yesterday, when my daughter and I were out on our bikes and got passed by a large tractor, the smell of unfiltered diesel exhaust connected straight back to what I remembered from 1970s school buses. It was like no time at all had passed, as I was immersed in a familiar — and reassuring —childhood aroma. The bus is here. It’s going to take me home.

So, I don’t find it surprising that there seems to be more popular songs about September than about any other month. Yes, there are lots of songs about holidays or seasons that happen to take place during other months. But tell me … right off the top of your head, how many songs are there about December as a month? (Songs about Christmas and Winter Wonderland don’t count.) I really like GNR’s “November Rain,” but how many other popular songs even mention that month by name? Even the hit songs about summer don’t usually mention any particular month.

There’s something about September that has inspired quite a lot of emotional expression in music.Let’s count down the list of my own personal favorites:

#7 September (Earth, Wind and Fire). Attend any major league baseball game at this time of year, and I bet you’ll hear this one blasting over the stadium sound system at least once between innings. There’s nothing quite like it to get you on your feet, clapping your hands, and hoping your team can still win enough games to snag a playoff slot. And even if you’re not at a MLB game … who can resist the song’s terrific, psychedelic seventies music video? There’ll never be a cloudy day as you rock out to this one.

#6 See You in September (The Happenings). This one has been recorded several times, by different artists, but this version from 1966 is my favorite. Living in the days of instantaneous (and constant) communication, it’s easy to forget that it wasn’t always that way. I still remember saying goodbye to friends for the summer, and knowing you weren’t going to see them again for months. No Facebook updates. No emails. No tweets. Getting a letter or two in the mail was a really big deal. This song captures, really nicely, the angst of being separated for a few months (even the glorious months of summer) from a young romantic love or crush, and wondering what the person will be like when the new school year finally starts. I don’t know about the rest of you, but I certainly had my own experiences with this 25-30 years ago … and song brings back a lot of memories of those earlier days.


#5 Come Monday (Jimmy Buffett). Admittedly, it does not mention “September” by name, but it’s the only song I know of that specifically mentions Labor Day. I always have it my head all weekend at this time of year. This is by far my favorite Jimmy Buffett tune, as I think it so nicely captures the feelings of sadness as summer comes to a close. I set it to loop over and over again yesterday as I cleaned my office and prepared to make a fresh start after the holiday weekend.

#4 September Morn (Neil Diamond). Now we’re getting even more emotional and introspective. But what I like most about this song is how — like the smell of diesel exhaust — it always takes me straight back to the crisp mornings of fifth grade, watching from the window of a big yellow school bus as the semi-rural scenery rolls past. The song came out in 1979, and the station my bus driver listened to played Neil Diamond all the time. When I hear those mournful strings, I can practically smell the black vinyl of the bus seats, and feel the coolness of the window against my nose, as I wonder what the new school year will bring.

#3 Wake Me Up When September Ends (Green Day). Billie Joe Armstrong wrote the song about his father, who died of cancer in September of 1982, when Billie was ten. The sense of loss permeates it; anyone who’s suffered a significant loss will find this song resonates deeply. The artistry with which he connects the loss of his father with the general sense of loss many of us feel in September is simply masterful.

#2 September (Daughtry).  This is almost my favorite song on the list. It’s by far my favorite official music video of any song on this list (and one of my favorite music videos, period). The introspective lyrics, about time going by but memories still remaining, mixed with images from old home movies (clearly shot around the time of my own childhood) always give me chills. What I personally find most powerful comes late in the song, when he says “you know we had to leave this town.” For those of us who grew up with the sense that we had to leave our hometown to find all that life had in store for us, and don’t really have regrets, but do sometimes reflect on what could have been had we chosen differently … this really captures the emotions all tied up in the experience.

What I find especially moving is the visual he chooses for this section: speeding through a tunnel. Every time I watch it, and hear “you know we had to leave this town,” I go straight back to the Interstate 90 tunnel running east out of Seattle. Early on a summer morning in 1991, that was me — starting a cross-country trek in my burgundy-colored 1983 Volvo coupe, college diploma and all other worldly possessions jammed in the trunk, getting ready to launch my career in political polling.

#1 The September of My Years (Frank Sinatra).  Sinatra has long been one of my favorite performers, and no one has a voice quite like his. I became a fan of his at the age of eleven (long story), and I’m still a fan today. All I’m going to say is: the older I get, the more I appreciate and truly love this song. I can’t think of any other commentary to make. Just close your eyes and listen, and you’ll know why it’s my favorite song about my favorite month:

Hope you all have a terrific September!

Great Book Reviews

My novel, Full Cycle, has gotten some very nice reviews this summer. In addition to what readers have posted at Amazon, Mark Livingood at The TandemGeek’s Blog recently put up a terrific review of the book. An excerpt:

Full Cycle struck me as being a very compelling, life’s lessons story of believable proportions.  In other words, all of the characters seemed very credible and real.  I suspect the latter may be because there’s apparently a lot of Christopher Blunt’s life experiences captured in the story and its characters.

For tandem enthusiasts, yes… a tandem bicycle is very central to the story and the account of the main characters introduction to and riding experiences on the tandem was something that will resonate with all tandem riders, large and small.  And, small is the key to this story: it’s ultimately about a father and 12-year old son pairing up and taking on the annual Seattle to Portland (STP) ride.  The story offers a great perspective on how a tandem can build on strong family relationships between parents and their children as well as how cycling can play an important role in the modern family.

Earlier this summer, the Cascade Courier, the newspaper of the Pacific Northwest’s largest bicycle club, ran this wonderful review:

Cascade Full Cycle Review

Full Cycle is available in print at Amazon or Barnes & Noble, and in Kindle format at Amazon.

Safely Penned

A few days ago, we made the decision to put Mother Duck and her surviving ducklings in a garden pen. One week ago today, she’d hatched ten little ones. They all did fine the first couple of days, but then began disappearing. As much fun as it had been, watching the little duck family free-range all over the property, we didn’t want her to lose any more of her brood.

Wednesday afternoon, I got one of the pens cleared out; we turned the pullet chicks loose, and consolidated the Cornish Cross meat chickens into our other pen. Next came the challenge of actually catching Mother Duck.

I began looking for her, and immediately got confirmation of my decision to move them to a pen. Four of her ducklings were happily swimming in  a puddle behind the barn, completely unsupervised. Mother Duck was about 50 feet away, with her other three ducklings, honking and quacking for the four missing ones. She seems to have walked off from the puddle, followed by three, and hadn’t realized that the other four had ignored her. And, naturally, the four were continuing to ignore her. (Wouldn’t you, if you were having a grand old time swimming?)

The four swimmers were easiest to catch, so we put them in the pen first. One of the Yeoman Farm Children then helped me catch Mother Duck. That was quite difficult, because she’s a fast runner. Eventually we tired her out, and were were helped by her wanting to stay fairly close to her other three ducklings (one reason we didn’t put those three in the pen right away).

I carried Mother Duck to the pen, and Helper Kid carried the three ducklings. The transfer to the pen went smoothly. I made sure she had plenty of water and high-protein feed, and that the pen was secure.Duck In Pen.jpg

One of the seven ducklings did end up dying; we’re not sure what the cause was, but one morning when I came out for chores, it was simply laying dead in the pen. But that happens; baby birds are fragile. The other six have been thriving. Mother Duck isn’t thrilled about being confined, but I know this is the right move. She’s taking really good care of the six, brooding and keeping them warm at night. We’re able to get good feed into them. And none of them is getting lost in the high weeds.